Currently in the UK we have voluntary self regulation for complementary therapies i.e. it is not compulsory. It is the person doing the Reiki who is regulated, not the Reiki itself, i.e. it is how they work and their interaction with the public.

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Background to Regulation

In February 1996, HRH Prince Charles proposed the Integrated Medicine initiative to encourage orthodox and complementary healthcare to work together within the NHS for the benefit of the British public. For this to happen, complementary therapies were required to be self regulated and to develop robust systems to ensure high standards of practice and levels of care, to bring them in line with other healthcare professionals who are also expected to hold nationally recognised qualifications.

The House of Lords (Science & Technology Committee) Report on Complementary Therapies in 2000 advised that Voluntary Self Regulation be introduced for Complementary Therapies. As a result of this 12 different therapy groups were invited by the then Prince of Wales Foundation for Integrated Health (PWFIH), to be involved with the consultation and process towards Voluntary Self Regulation. This went through what was called the “Federal Working Group” and culminated in the introduction of the CHNC as one regulatory body, although others have subsequently been formed.

As part of the UK Reiki Federation’s ongoing objective of promoting best practice and professional conduct, it has been involved with, and made a major contribution towards the regulation of Reiki as a profession, and in the development of minimum standards of training.

Roles in the Regulatory Process

Regulator

Regulates the practice of Reiki (and other therapies/disciplines). Currently in the UK we have voluntary self regulation for complementary therapies ie it is not compulsory. It is the person doing the Reiki who is regulated, not the Reiki itself ie it is how they work and their interaction with the public.

The role of the regulatory body is primarily to protect the public in that it gives the public and employers quality assurance that the practitioner's qualifications and/or experience is such that it meets the minimum standard required for professional practice. It also gives the same quality assurance to doctors and all other health care professionals who may use a national register. Registrants will have to be insured and sign up to a CPD Policy (continuing professional development), disciplinary procedures and code of professional conduct and ethics.

Professional Associations

The UK Reiki Federation is one of many professional associations, and is the largest Reiki professional association in the UK. A professional association's role is to represent its membership, looking after the needs of the professional therapist. A professional body will offer insurance, CPD opportunities, journals or newsletters, support groups, advertising leaflets, conferences etc.

In addition the UKRF receives innumerable enquiries from the public about Reiki, and for requests for names of practitioners and teachers. It helps to promote these through advertising and attendance at exhibitions and conferences.

Regulator or Professional Association? An example of this is the RCN (Royal College of Nursing) which is the professional body and the NMC (Nursing & Midwifery Council) is the regulatory body.


Advisory Body

The Reiki Council is an advisory body and is made up of Reiki Professional Associations, who provide advice about Reiki

Awarding Body

An awarding body sets up and gets approval to run accredited courses. Approval for accreditation is given through UKCES.